Tuesday, November 20, 2018
   
Text Size

Site Search powered by Ajax

London Mayor Sadiq Khan calls for second referendum on Brexit

In an editorial for the Observer newspaper, the Labour Party politician said Brexit would cause job losses.

London's Mayor Sadiq Khan has called for a fresh referendum on Britain's membership of the European Union, warning that leaving the bloc could lead to job losses and worsened economic prospects.

In an editorial published in the Observer newspaper, Khan slammed the British government for its handling of negotiations with the EU.

"At every stage, [Prime Minister Theresa May's] government has looked unprepared and out of its depth, resulting in a litany of wrong turns," Khan wrote, before criticising his predecessor as London mayor, Boris Johnson, for prioritising his political ambitions. 

"It seems the debate has become more about Boris Johnson's political ambitions than what's good for the country."

The United Kingdom has until March 2019 to secure a deal with the EU over the terms of its exit from the organisation, known as Brexit, but Prime Minister Theresa May only agreed to a unified negotiating platform with her cabinet in July.

That has led to worries that Britain is heading for a 'no-deal Brexit' that would see the country revert to World Trade Organisation rules on trade and force it to pay tariffs on goods imported from the EU.

Critics of Brexit warn that failure to reach an agreement would result in mass job losses as costs increase and see businesses shift their operations to the EU.

The British government has already admitted to stockpiling medicines in case the country leaves the EU without a deal.

Anti-Brexit feeling

Khan said that the scenarios for the British exit from the EU were "a million miles from what was promised during the referendum campaign" in 2016.

"I don't believe it's the will of the people to face either a bad deal or, worse, no deal. That wasn't on the table during the campaign.

"People didn't vote to leave the EU to make themselves poorer, to watch their businesses suffer, to have NHS wards understaffed, to see the police preparing for civil unrest or for national security to be put at risk if our cooperation with the EU in the fight against terrorism is weakened," Khan said.

The comments by the London mayor come amid rising political pressure on both the government and the opposition Labour Party to call for a second referendum.

Both parties are divided on the issue and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has so far resisted pressure from within his party and from trade unions to publicly call for a new vote.

May's ruling Conservatives are divided between those who support a 'soft' approach to leaving the EU, those who wish to remain in the bloc, and others who want a complete separation from the organisation.


blog comments powered by Disqus

Subscribe via RSS or Email:

Two border crossings open in divided Cyprus, first in 8 years

Read More

Ukraine rebel regions vote in polls slammed by Kiev and the West

Read More

UN chief sees 'parallels' with 1930s amid nationalism warnings

Read More

Macron urges world leaders to 'fight for peace' on WWI centenary

Read More

Erdogan and Trump meet in Paris amid Khashoggi crisis

Read More

12 killed in Sicily as death toll in Italy floods mounts

Read More

Donation

Thanks to all of our supporters for your generosity and your encouragement of an independent press!

Enter Amount:

Featured_Author

Login






Login reminder Forgot login?

Subscribe to MWC News Alert

Email Address

Subscribe in a reader Facebok page Twitter page

Israel pounds Gaza

India's Kerala state devastated

Capturing life under apartheid